Quote of the Week and Rose nib

marx
Paper:  Mnemosyne
Ink:  J. Herbin Pearlescent red
Nib:  Brause Rose (Brause 76)

Recently I finally relinquish my will and give in to the temptation to Brause Rose nib, despite the fact that I have plenty dip nibs in the arsenal   Perhaps this irrational behavior epitomizes Marx’s observation of the fallacy of capitalism?  🙂   To Marx’s imaginary dismay, Rose nib is worth every bit of the wait.  It is a lot soften compare to other Brause nibs I have and the line variation it is capable of is breathtaking.  Because of its litheness and sensitivity to pressure, a lighter hand is required; in fact, hairline can be made by barely gliding nib across the surface can produce hairlines.  Since I usually write heavy handedly (Comparatively, the pressure has lessen than before.  I do not wish to murder my pens!), my usual cue on putting too much pressure is to hear the scratching sound made on paper surface.

One of the most common gripes on dip pen is the inconsistent ink flow and repeated dipping.  To ameliorate this problem, I use Gentian’s idea on a masking tape reservoir, which improves the flow tremendously.  One note on the J. Herbin’s pearlescent ink is that the pigment can lump as the water evaporates, and couple droplets of water can easily remedy the situation.  I have been going back and forth about this ink, but I often found myself going back to it for the luster. The pearlescent pigment gives embossing effect to the text, though one needs to be careful not to smear it.

IMG_0368
Scribbles made by rose nib.  The line variation is very exciting!

By the way, if you are looking for books for your summer reading, consider The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery, where this quotation of Marx can be found .  It is a slow reading, but I was captivated immediately by the first two short pages I read.  Stylistically, this book reminds me of  Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder.

What are your thoughts on dip pen?

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6 thoughts on “Quote of the Week and Rose nib

  1. I just caved in and bought this nib yesterday (while trying to fullfil free shipping threshold) but I kind of (more like deliberately) left out the nib holder…So I guess I only got if for the rose emboss. I am the kind of lazy @$$ who doesn't even want to switch pen mid-drawing so I guess dip-pen is a no-no, at least for the time being.

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  2. Beautiful writing sample! I've yet to try Gentian's masking tape trick but it's great to hear it works for you too.

    And I might need to read this book if only because it has the word “hedgehog” in it and that sparked my interest 😉

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  3. I found dip pen to be versatile because you can literally use any type of ink with it (pigmented, metallic, shellac; sky is your limit!). It does not do as well with fountain pen ink, which tends to be thin in consistency. The masking tape trick I mentioned in the post actually ameliorate this problem. The acquaintance period with dip pen, however, is longer with dip pen than most fountain pens because there is no feed to supply steady ink flow. In addition, it will require constant practice, but the result is very rewarding, in my opinion. I hope you will venture into and have with them!

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  4. If you have an art supply store nearby, you can pick up a pen holder for relatively low price. The beauty of dip pen too is you can switch out nibs easily while you complete the mangum opus. Another way around switching out the nib is to have two nib holders. It is a very fun nib for you to miss out! 😉

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  5. Thank you Estivalia, but I am sure I am not doing justice to the nib. Apparently Gentian's masking tape trick will work with regular fountain pen ink, which is thin in consistency therefore, harder to use with a dip pen. I have not yet tried it out, but will let you know how it turns out!
    The Elegance of the Hedgehog is an interesting book, but heavy in philosophy. The author rephrases some of the most complex and hard to chew philosophical principles into something lighthearted and easy to understand. I like it a lot and I hope you will too, if you decide to read it.

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